FamilySearch Offers New WWI Records on Armistice 100th Anniversary

FamilySearch celebrates WWI 100th Armistice with millions of new, free WWI historical records to help families discover more about their WWI veteran ancestors.

Source: FamilySearch Offers New WWI Records on Armistice 100th Anniversary

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Guest Post: WINTER HEALTH MYTHS BUSTED!

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WINTER HEALTH MYTHS BUSTED!

There are endless winter health myths that we have heard from well intentioned grandparents and parents. They have become so ingrained in us that we take them as cold hard facts. Many of these myths have no more basis in reality than Santa Claus.  Of course, everyone wants to stay as healthy as possible during the frosty months. In order to do so sensibly, we turned to Board Certified NYC internist and gastroenterologist Dr. Niket Sonpal.

Myth: Allergies go away in the winter

Allergies might be the real source behind your stuffy nose and scratchy throat this season. According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, one in five people suffer from indoor/outdoor allergies, and the indoor variety can actually be worse in the winter. Dr. Sonpal cautions that, “If your symptoms last longer than 10 days or ease up after taking an antihistamine, it might be time to visit an allergist.”

Myth: I wash my hands all the time with hand sanitizer, so I should be fine.

Hand sanitizer will kill most viruses, but not all. You must make sure you use the right amount of hand sanitizer and let it dry completely. Dr. Sonpal points out that,” Some viruses, like norovirus, which causes vomiting, is not killed by hand sanitizer. Soap and water are best to get rid of all bacteria and viruses, but the hand sanitizer is better than nothing at all.”

Myth: It’s cold out, I don’t need sunscreen.

The sun’s rays are just as strong in the winter months as they are in the other seasons. Snow and ice can reflect even more sunlight, up to twice as much. Grab the SPF 30 and put it on, regardless of the temperature. Don’t forget those sunglasses to keep your eyes safe as well.

I’ll just drink some alcohol to keep myself warm.

Although it may feel like drinking alcohol is making you warmer, it does not. Dr. Sonpal says that, “when you drink, the blood vessels dilate or get bigger, and blood flows to your skin and away from your internal organs. So, it may feel like you are getting warmer, but you are not.”

Myth: The Flu Shot Gives You the Flu

According to a new survey from the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases and Rite Aide, 44 percent of American women view the flu as a serious threat to their health. Yet nearly half (49 percent) do not intend to get a flu shot this year because they believe the vaccine can give them the flu. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends the flu shot for anyone older than 6 months of age. Dr. Sonpal stresses that, “The shot does not contain a live virus, making catching the flu from it impossible.”

Winter weather makes you store fat and gain weight

Our bodies do not go into some kind of winter hibernation mode, stockpiling every ounce of fat to use for the lean times. It seems logical, like a throwback to our days living in caves foraging for food, but in reality, any weight gain comes from our winter habits. Dr. Sonpal points out that, “we tend to exercise less in winter. We eat more hearty meals and comfort foods, including more sugary snacks and desserts (especially around the holidays).”

Myth: You Lose Most Heat Through Your Head

The saying goes “we lose 90 percent of our body heat through our heads.”  But a 2006 study found that the head accounts for about 7 percent of the body’s surface area, and that heat loss in the region is fairly proportional, according to LiveScience. “Your head is another extremity, and it’s susceptible to cold, so you should wear a hat, but it doesn’t lose any more heat than another part of your body,” says Dr. Sonpal.

Myth: Chicken Soup Will Cure Colds

Many cultures teach us to drink warm liquids like tea, hot apple cider, and soups when we’re dealing with colds. It’s true that something like chicken soup may help soothe and ease congestion, but much like vitamin C, hot soup won’t do immediate wonders.

Myth: Being Cold Gives You a Cold

No matter what your grandma might have told you, spending too much time in the cold air doesn’t make you sick. One study found that healthy men who spent several hours in temperatures just above freezing had an increase in healthy, virus-fighting activity in their immune systems. In fact, you’re more likely to get sick indoors, where germs are easily passed.

Myth: Feed a cold, starve a fever

Dr. Sonpal says that, “This is another myth that comes from a time when people didn’t understand the science of body chemistry. The thought was that if you had a cold, food would warm you up. Conversely, if you had a high fever, not eating would cool you down. This is just patently bad medical advice. In both cases, good nutrition gives your body the fuel it needs to fight infections and recover from an illness. When you have a fever, your body is burning energy at a rapid rate, and that needs to be replenished. So, by all means feed your cold; but also feed your fever, or any other illness. Even if you have stomach issues, find a way to take in lost fluids and electrolytes.”

 

About Dr. Niket Sonpal:

Dr. Niket Sonpal is a native of Long Island NY and a graduate of Medical University of Silesia – Hope Medical Institute in Poland. After completing his residency in Internal Medicine at Lenox Hill Hospital, he was selected to be the 2013‐2014 Chief Resident at Lenox Hill Hospital–Northshore LIJ Health System. He is an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine and Clinical instructor at Kingsbrook Jewish Medical Center, Brooklyn. Dr. Sonpal has completed his Fellowship in gastroenterology & hepatology at Lenox Hill Hospital and will continue his work in the field of medical student and resident test preparation. He now serves as the associate program director for the Internal Medicine Residency Program at Brookdale University medical center.

He is the co‐author for the best-selling Master the Boards: USMLE Step 2 CK, Master the Boards Step 3, And Master the Boards: Internal Medicine. He is also the Chief Operating Officer for Medquest Test Prep, Director of Medical Education for Picmonic Test Prep, and a recognized expert on medical test prep.

Book Review: The Anti-Inflammatory Diet Slow Cooker Cookbook: Prep-and-Go Recipes for Long-Term Healing by Madeline Given NC

The Anti-Inflammatory Diet Slow Cooker Cookbook: Prep-and-Go Recipes for Long-Term Healing by Madeline Given NC

We looked over The Anti-Inflammatory Diet Slow Cooker Cookbook: Prep-and-Go Recipes for Long-Term Healing by Madeline Given NC and found it to be easy to follow and well-written.

The beginning of the book explains a lot about anti-inflammatory eating and what should make up a good part of our diet.

We live in a fast-paced world where everyone eats fast on-the-go.  The book will help with that. Instead of grabbing a quick burger from the local fast food drive thru, we can have a hot, delicious, healthy meal.

Prep time is kept to a minimum and most of the cooking takes place slowly while we are doing other things. If you don’t have enough time to fix the recipes in this book, you don’t have enough time to go tell a clown head what you want to eat, either.

We think you will really like The Anti-Inflammatory Diet Slow Cooker Cookbook.  It will make a great present for any would be cook on your list.

We were sent a complimentary copy of this book.  We are under no obligation to write any review, positive or negative.

We are disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Notice: This post contains affiliate links. If you click a link and make a purchase, we may financially benefit from your transaction, at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.

PS Annie! is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

Book Review: 30-Minute Cooking for Two: Healthy Dishes Without All the Fuss by Taylor Ellingson

30-Minute Cooking for Two: Healthy Dishes Without All the Fuss by Taylor Ellingson

Available for pre-order now at Amazon.com.

Suzanne and I remember the days when we were newlywed.  She could cook up anything she wanted to without having to worry about picky eaters.  We passed those years a long time ago and are now back to being almost empty nesters.

That is where cookbooks like 30-Minute Cooking for Two: Healthy Dishes Without All the Fuss by Taylor Ellingson will now come in handy.  Suzanne can whip up small batches of food quickly and easily with no fuss or muss.

The recipes in this book are quick and easy to prepare.  Most of the recipes use only eight ingredients or less. There are easy to find ingredients that should be available in your local store.

Whether you are a newlywed couple, or empty nesters, you will find 30-Minute Cooking for Two to be loaded with lots of great ideas.  This will make a great gift for the cooks on your list.

We were sent a complimentary copy of this book.  We are under no obligation to write any review, positive or negative.

We are disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Notice: This post contains affiliate links. If you click a link and make a purchase, we may financially benefit from your transaction, at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.

PS Annie! is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affi liate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

Guest Post: Keep pets’ safety in mind this Thanksgiving, Pet Sitters International advises

 

This article was provided by Pet Sitters International (PSI).

Keep pets’ safety in mind this Thanksgiving, Pet Sitters International advises

The association offers tips to ensure pets and humans both have a safe and happy holiday.

KING, N.C. (November 5, 2018) — Thanksgiving—it’s a time for falling leaves, family gatherings and plenty of turkey and stuffing—but the holiday is not always a festive time for pets. Pet Sitters International (PSI), the world’s leading educational organization for professional pet sitters, advises pet owners to keep in mind their four-legged family members’ safety when planning Thanksgiving activities this year.

“Simple holiday traditions, such as hosting a Thanksgiving feast for friends and family, can pose potential problems to pets if not monitored carefully,” advised PSI President Patti J. Moran.

“Fortunately, there are simple precautions pet owners can take to help promote a safe and happy holiday for pets and humans alike.”

PSI offers the following tips for pet owners to keep in mind this Thanksgiving:

  1. Know which treats are “off-limits.” Food is a culprit for some of the most common holiday pet emergencies, so know which foods are off-limits for your pets, and make it clear to any guests. Holiday treats—such as rich, fatty scraps; bones from pork and poultry; alcoholic beverages; chocolate; and other sweets and candies—can be harmful or toxic to pets. Some of these foods have been linked to pancreatitis in pets. Signs and symptoms of an inflamed pancreas include vomiting and abdominal pain, and severe pancreatitis requires emergency medical care and treatment. Other dangerous substances for pets include the sugar substitute xylitol, bread dough and onions. If a pet ingests any potentially harmful product, call a veterinarian or a local emergency animal hospital immediately.
  1. Put holiday decorations out of pets’ reach. Will you be decorating your home with cornucopias, pine cones, plants, lights or other festive décor this Thanksgiving? Or will you put up a Christmas tree or other holiday decorations following the Thanksgiving feast? Be sure to keep out of pets’ reach any decorations that could be harmful if chewed on or ingested.
  1. Provide a safe space for pets. For pets that are easily frightened or not used to being around a lot of people, Thanksgiving can be an especially stressful time. If guests will be at your home, make sure you have a room set aside where your pet can relax with favorite toys and will not be disturbed. It is also important to make sure your pet is wearing an identification tag with your name and current contact information, in case he or she slips out the door as guests come and go. You may also want to consider microchipping your pet.
  1. Don’t delay hiring a professional pet sitter. If you will be celebrating Thanksgiving or another holiday away from home, your pet could benefit from the services of a professional pet sitter. PSI advises pet owners to only use the services of professional pet sitters and to begin the search for pet care as soon as possible. PSI recently surveyed nearly 1,000 professional pet sitters and found that 65 percent say they are usually fully booked for holiday pet-sitting visits at least two to three weeks prior to the holiday.

Anyone can post a profile on a pet-sitting or dog-walking website or app, so it is important to make sure you are choosing a qualified pet-care provider. PSI recommends pet owners schedule an initial consultation with a potential pet sitter prior to booking services and offers a free pet-sitter interview checklist on the PSI website. Pet owners can search PSI’s Pet Sitter Locator free of charge at www.petsit.com/locate.

“Finding a pet sitter you trust allows you to truly enjoy your holiday, so pet owners shouldn’t delay in seeking professional pet sitters to watch their pets while they’re away visiting family, attending holiday parties or simply shopping late,” Moran said.

To learn more about PSI, visit www.petsit.com.

 

About Pet Sitters International

Founded in 1994 by Patti J. Moran, author of Pet Sitting for Profit, Pet Sitters International (PSI) is the world’s largest educational association for professional pet sitters, with member pet-sitting businesses in the United States, Canada and more than 20 other countries. PSI members have access to the widest array of business services and educational resources available in the professional pet-sitting industry. PSI’s Pet Sitter Locator is the largest online directory of professional pet sitters, and pet owners can visit petsit.com/locate to find local professional pet sitters.

This article was provided by Pet Sitters International (PSI).