Book Review: Competing With Giants: How One Family-Owned Company Took on the Multinationals and Won by Phương Uyên Trần and Jackie Horne

Competing With Giants: How One Family-Owned Company Took on the Multinationals and Won by Phương Uyên Trần and Jackie Horne

It is unusual to find a book like Competing With Giants: How One Family-Owned Company Took on the Multinationals and Won by Phương Uyên Trần and Jackie Horne. It works well as a casual reading experience about business. It also works well as a source of historical information.

In this book, readers learn a little about the history of Vietnam and the surrounding areas. Readers learn about the perceptions the Vietnamese people have of the United States of America and the rest of the world.

By now, you may be thinking that this book only works as a business book and a history book. It also gives readers an insight into how families can, and perhaps should, relate to one another.

This book works as a book to inspire small business owners as they seek to compete with larger companies. This book works also as a biography of the founder and founding family of one of the largest companies in Vietnam, as well as a biography of the author.

If you are in business and want to compete on a global level, you should read this book. It should help you understand a little better about how to think like the culture you are trying to market to.

We give Competing With Giants all five stars. We think it is written well and provides a wealth of information from the perspective of someone other than a Western business person. It would make a great textbook.

We were sent a complimentary PDF copy of this book. We are under no obligation to write any review, positive or negative.

We are disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Notice: This post contains affiliate links. If you click a link and make a purchase, we may financially benefit from your transaction, at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.

PS Annie! is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.

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Book Review: Crude Blessings by T. M. “Roe” Patterson

Crude Blessings by T.M. “Roe” Patterson

In the book Crude Blessings by T.M. “Roe” Patterson, readers are treated to a fascinating look into the life of two true Texans. We challenge you to read it without shedding a single tear.

This book makes for great entertainment, but it also provides a look at some truly great business minds.

It can be exhilarating to be on the front lines of a startup business. There is a special excitement when failure is not an option. This book puts readers on the front line to see how honesty and integrity can overcome a world of obstacles.

This makes an absolutely wonderful book with tons of life lessons.

The sad part in all of this is that, according to several of the other books we have reviewed recently, such as The Aging Brain and Unsafe at Any Meal , Alzheimer’s disease, Autism, ADD/ADHD and other brain related problems can be avoided. It appears that there is anecdotal evidence to support the notion that high fructose corn syrup and mercury in our diets cause these brain conditions.

We give Crude Blessings all five stars. We simply cannot believe that this is this author’s first book. Very few could write this well and tell a story this fascinating the first time out of the chute.

We were sent a complimentary copy of this book. We are under no obligation to write any review, positive or negative.

We are disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Notice: This post contains affiliate links. If you click a link and make a purchase, we may financially benefit from your transaction, at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.

Book Review: The Sons of Wetbacks: A Memoir about America, Immigration, and Jacob’s 5 Uncles Who Were the Sons of Wetbacks and All Served in WWII by Jacob Montilijo Monty

The Sons of Wetbacks: A Memoir about America, Immigration, and Jacob’s 5 Uncles Who Were the Sons of Wetbacks and All Served in WWII by Jacob Montilijo Monty

Many years ago, the Irish in America were exactly where Mexicans in America are today. We were seen as a necessary evil. It was fine to use us, abuse us, and discriminate against us, but they needed us to fill jobs no one else would.

In the book The Sons of Wetbacks: A Memoir about America, Immigration, and Jacob’s 5 Uncles Who Were the Sons of Wetbacks and All Served in WWII by Jacob Montilijo Monty, we read about how necessary Mexican immigrants are, those who come in legally and otherwise.

To be sure, there are many things business and the government are doing to exacerbate the problem. There are things like a special checkbox on most forms and surveys that give the option to select Hispanic or not Hispanic. This seems wrong to most non-Hispanics, and maybe to some Hispanics.

We live on the Texas Gulf Coast where most of the Hispanics we know are conservative and speak better English than many native-born Americans.

I cannot count the number of times we had people come into the convenience store where we worked complaining that the legally required signs were in English and Spanish, but not other languages that are represented in the area, like Czech and Polish.

It would seem that in order to smooth out problems like this, the government should publish official forms only in English and the federal government should adopt English as the official language of the U. S., once and for all.

The Sons of Wetbacks is very well-written. It makes some very good points and helps to dispel several myths. We give it all five stars. We think that anyone on either side of the issue of immigration reform should read this book.

We were sent a complimentary copy of this book. We are under no obligation to write any review, positive or negative.

We are disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Notice: This post contains affiliate links. If you click a link and make a purchase, we may financially benefit from your transaction, at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.

Book Review: Purge on the Potomac by David Thomas Roberts

Purge on the Potomac by David Thomas Roberts

Available 30 August 2018

As most of our blog readers know, we don’t normally read fiction. It is very difficult to review fiction because you don’t want to give away any secrets that might spoil the book.

On the rare occasion that we do read fiction, it is difficult to find any fiction book in keeping with our Christian values. Too often we find books that are really cheesy romance novels, with a very little bit of plot mixed in between the raunchy sex scenes.

Purge on the Potomac (The Patriot Series) by David Thomas Roberts is different. It is a very exciting and, at times, funny book about the very real threats we all face since many of our elected officials, at all levels, think we serve at their pleasure rather than the other way around.

It does use the Lord’s name as a curse twice, once on page 192 and again on page 316 of the paperback edition we were given as an advanced media copy for review. This explains why our star rating is not all five stars. Our review policy states up front not to send us any books with the Lord’s name used in vain.

Other than that, this book is the most exciting and interesting fiction book David has ever read. It takes place here in the State of Texas. What is really interesting to us is that the author, David Thomas Roberts, has a scene take place on a ranch in Shiner, Texas. Mr Roberts may be aware that there is just such a ranch, owned by the Roberts family, that resembles his description in Shiner, Texas. We know the Roberts that purchased said property is David’s maternal grandpa, Leon Wallis Roberts. He is buried in the Shiner cemetery.

The author does an outstanding job of capturing the sentiment that is held by most Texans regarding the second amendment and interference in The Great State of Texas. It is not a question of IF Texas will secede, but when.

Purge on the Potomac is the kind of book you just can’t put down. It is very exciting right up to the last page where you have to sit back and say, “Wow”.

We were sent a complimentary advanced media copy of this book. We are under no obligation to write any review, positive or negative.

We are disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Notice: This post contains affiliate links. If you click a link and make a purchase, we may financially benefit from your transaction, at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.

Book Review: Warriors in Mr. Lincoln’s Army: Native American Soldiers Who Fought in the Civil War by Quita V. Shier

Warriors in Mr. Lincoln’s Army: Native American Soldiers Who Fought in the Civil War by Quita V. Shier

By now you have seen many books that would be a great addition to your genealogy library. You may be thinking, “Where am I going to put another one?” Warriors in Mr. Lincoln’s Army: Native American Soldiers Who Fought in the Civil War by Quita V. Shier is one of those books you will be glad you made room for on your shelf.

This book is very well-researched. It is broken down by each individual who served in Company K. The author provides as much information on each person’s life story as could be found.

The great thing about Warriors in Mr. Lincoln’s Army is that you could read it from cover to cover and love it. You could also just flip to a particular person’s story and find out all there is to know about that person.

Along the way, you will also learn about the conditions at hospitals, prisons, and on the field.

If you are at all interested in the War for Southern Independence, you will want to add Warriors in Mr. Lincoln’s Army to your “To be read” list.

We give this book all five stars. It is very well-written and extremely well-researched.

We were sent a complimentary copy of this book. We are under no obligation to write any review, positive or negative.

We are disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Notice: This post contains affiliate links. If you click a link and make a purchase, we may financially benefit from your transaction, at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.

Book Review: The Flying Tigers: The Untold Story of the American Pilots Who Waged a Secret War Against Japan by Sam Kleiner

The Flying Tigers: The Untold Story of the American Pilots Who Waged a Secret War Against Japan by Sam Kleiner

If you like to read about fighter pilots or World War II like I do, you will enjoy The Flying Tigers: The Untold Story of the American Pilots Who Waged a Secret War Against Japan by Sam Kleiner.

This is a good account of what went on during the top secret days before the war. It is the story as taken from letters written back home to the families and friends of those infamous Flying Tigers.

This is a very interesting story written, while trying to be factually accurate, to tell the story of the leader and founder of the Flying Tigers and his fight to keep the Tigers flying.

To be honest, I never knew how involved the U. S. was with China at the time. Most of the books I have read mentioned the war in China more as a footnote than anything else.

We learn a little more about Pappy Boyington and his Black Sheep. We read about how a direct descendant of Robert E. Lee is buried in the rose garden at Lee’s home.

We give The Flying Tigers four out of five stars. It is a good book, but it just does not get to the level of “Can’t put it down.”

We were sent a complimentary copy of this book. We are under no obligation to write any review, positive or negative.

We are disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Notice: This post contains affiliate links. If you click a link and make a purchase, we may financially benefit from your transaction, at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.

Book Review: The Mayflower: The Families, the Voyage, and the Founding of America by Rebecca Fraser

The Mayflower: The Families, the Voyage, and the Founding of America by Rebecca Fraser

We love history. We love to study genealogy. The Mayflower: The Families, the Voyage, and the Founding of America by Rebecca Fraser is chock full of both.

We learned so much about history that we never even knew existed from this book. Not only did we learn about early America, we also learned about England, the Netherlands, and a little about Scotland as well.

The Mayflower is very well-written and extremely well-researched. We give it all five stars. This is one of those history books you just don’t want to put down because, not only is it interesting history, it is very readable. We learned more at every turn of the page.

We were sent a complimentary advance reading copy of this book. We are under no obligation to write any review, positive or negative.

We are disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Notice: This post contains affiliate links. If you click a link and make a purchase, we may financially benefit from your transaction, at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.

Book Review: Texit: Why and How Texas Will Leave the Union by Daniel Miller

Texit : Why and How Texas Will Leave the Union by Daniel Miller

The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America,

When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

By now you know that, just like the Declaration of Independence of the United States of America says, it has become necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which connect us to the United States of America.

We just finished reading a media copy of the book Texit: Why and How Texas Will Leave the Union by Daniel Miller. This book will be available 21 April 2018.

We have to say that Miller answers most, if not all, of the questions we had regarding what will happen when we Texans decide to vote to leave the union of states. Not “IF”, “WHEN”.

Texit is very well-written and very well-researched. Miller is right there in the middle of the debate and has heard the inevitable questions that one asks themselves regarding Texit and how it will work.

No matter which side, if either, of the issue of Texit one falls on, they owe it to themselves to read this book to learn more about what is going on in Texas.

Texit is easy to read and well thought out. It is a good source for talking points and answers a lot of the questions of why?

Most Texans would love to have the Ten Commandments back on the court house grounds. We could put them back after a Texit.

We were told we had to allow TSA agents to pat us down and take liberties no one should take with any other person. We actually proposed a law here in Texas that made it illegal for strip searches and pat downs by TSA. The U. S. government then informed us there would be no flights into or out of Texas if that law were passed. I am really surprised we didn’t pass it anyway.

There are so many reasons for Texas to leave the union and no good reasons to stay. No matter what you believe on the issue of Texit, you need to buy yourself a copy of Texit.

We were sent a complimentary Media copy of this book. We are under no obligation to write any review, positive or negative.

We are disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Notice: This post contains affiliate links. If you click a link and make a purchase, we may financially benefit from your transaction, at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.

Book Review: The Iron Fist: The Immigrant Journey of J. B. Leonis to Riches and Power in Southern California by Richard Nordin

The Iron Fist: The Immigrant Journey of J. B. Leonis to Riches and Power in Southern California by Richard Nordin

If you are interested in uncommon history, you won’t be disappointed with The Iron Fist: The Immigrant Journey of J. B. Leonis to Riches and Power in Southern California.

As you may know by now, we here at McClendon Villa are very much into genealogy and family history. We were not disappointed by The Iron Fist even though, to the best of our knowledge, we are not related to anyone in the book.

The book takes us through the life of one man and how it changed due to a request from his uncle, whom he barely knew. It is the story of sort of a wild west and progress.

The Iron Fist is very interesting and entertaining. It is well-written and well-researched. We give it all five stars.

If you want to learn a little about the early days of the city of Los Angeles, silent film stars, the longest bar in the world, or a city that did not want anyone to live there, you’ve got to read The Iron Fist.

We were sent a complimentary copy of this book. We are under no obligation to write any review, positive or negative.

We are disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

Notice: This post contains affiliate links. If you click a link and make a purchase, we may financially benefit from your transaction, at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support.