Guest Post: Keep pets’ safety in mind this Thanksgiving, Pet Sitters International advises

 

This article was provided by Pet Sitters International (PSI).

Keep pets’ safety in mind this Thanksgiving, Pet Sitters International advises

The association offers tips to ensure pets and humans both have a safe and happy holiday.

KING, N.C. (November 5, 2018) — Thanksgiving—it’s a time for falling leaves, family gatherings and plenty of turkey and stuffing—but the holiday is not always a festive time for pets. Pet Sitters International (PSI), the world’s leading educational organization for professional pet sitters, advises pet owners to keep in mind their four-legged family members’ safety when planning Thanksgiving activities this year.

“Simple holiday traditions, such as hosting a Thanksgiving feast for friends and family, can pose potential problems to pets if not monitored carefully,” advised PSI President Patti J. Moran.

“Fortunately, there are simple precautions pet owners can take to help promote a safe and happy holiday for pets and humans alike.”

PSI offers the following tips for pet owners to keep in mind this Thanksgiving:

  1. Know which treats are “off-limits.” Food is a culprit for some of the most common holiday pet emergencies, so know which foods are off-limits for your pets, and make it clear to any guests. Holiday treats—such as rich, fatty scraps; bones from pork and poultry; alcoholic beverages; chocolate; and other sweets and candies—can be harmful or toxic to pets. Some of these foods have been linked to pancreatitis in pets. Signs and symptoms of an inflamed pancreas include vomiting and abdominal pain, and severe pancreatitis requires emergency medical care and treatment. Other dangerous substances for pets include the sugar substitute xylitol, bread dough and onions. If a pet ingests any potentially harmful product, call a veterinarian or a local emergency animal hospital immediately.
  1. Put holiday decorations out of pets’ reach. Will you be decorating your home with cornucopias, pine cones, plants, lights or other festive décor this Thanksgiving? Or will you put up a Christmas tree or other holiday decorations following the Thanksgiving feast? Be sure to keep out of pets’ reach any decorations that could be harmful if chewed on or ingested.
  1. Provide a safe space for pets. For pets that are easily frightened or not used to being around a lot of people, Thanksgiving can be an especially stressful time. If guests will be at your home, make sure you have a room set aside where your pet can relax with favorite toys and will not be disturbed. It is also important to make sure your pet is wearing an identification tag with your name and current contact information, in case he or she slips out the door as guests come and go. You may also want to consider microchipping your pet.
  1. Don’t delay hiring a professional pet sitter. If you will be celebrating Thanksgiving or another holiday away from home, your pet could benefit from the services of a professional pet sitter. PSI advises pet owners to only use the services of professional pet sitters and to begin the search for pet care as soon as possible. PSI recently surveyed nearly 1,000 professional pet sitters and found that 65 percent say they are usually fully booked for holiday pet-sitting visits at least two to three weeks prior to the holiday.

Anyone can post a profile on a pet-sitting or dog-walking website or app, so it is important to make sure you are choosing a qualified pet-care provider. PSI recommends pet owners schedule an initial consultation with a potential pet sitter prior to booking services and offers a free pet-sitter interview checklist on the PSI website. Pet owners can search PSI’s Pet Sitter Locator free of charge at www.petsit.com/locate.

“Finding a pet sitter you trust allows you to truly enjoy your holiday, so pet owners shouldn’t delay in seeking professional pet sitters to watch their pets while they’re away visiting family, attending holiday parties or simply shopping late,” Moran said.

To learn more about PSI, visit www.petsit.com.

 

About Pet Sitters International

Founded in 1994 by Patti J. Moran, author of Pet Sitting for Profit, Pet Sitters International (PSI) is the world’s largest educational association for professional pet sitters, with member pet-sitting businesses in the United States, Canada and more than 20 other countries. PSI members have access to the widest array of business services and educational resources available in the professional pet-sitting industry. PSI’s Pet Sitter Locator is the largest online directory of professional pet sitters, and pet owners can visit petsit.com/locate to find local professional pet sitters.

This article was provided by Pet Sitters International (PSI).

 

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Guest Post: Tips for Traveling with Pets

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Tips for Traveling with Pets

Flying with your pet: If you are going to take your pet on an airplane, it is important to determine whether your pet will need a crate or a carrier. Larger dogs will fly in a crate in the cargo, and smaller dogs that fit into a carrier can fly in the plane. Make sure you find out the requirements for your dog prior to booking your flight.

Familiarize your pet with its crate or carrier: Pets like familiarity. If you plan on keeping your pet inside a carrier or crate while traveling, make purchases at least a month before travel to allow your pet ample time to get comfortable with the new environment. Place him or her in the carrier and provide some treats. Gradually lengthen the time your pet is in the crate or carrier until your pet seems at ease in its new space.

Car safety: It is important that we always think about the dog’s safety while in your car. If you want your pet to sit on the seat, get your pup a dog seatbelt. It allows your dog room to move around, but provides restraint in the case of an accident. If you have an SUV, you can buy a gate that keeps your dog from jumping from the back to the front.

Feed your pet no less than five or six hours before traveling: It is very easy for your dog or cat to become sick during travel. Providing time for food to digest lessens the chances of your pet becoming ill.

Find a pet-friendly hotel:  And if you’ve got plans during the day, since most pet-friendly hotels will not allow pets to be left in the room alone, consider taking your dog to a nearby Camp Bow Wow® doggie day care facility or hire a Home Buddies by Camp Bow Wow® pet sitter to keep Fido company. Camp is open early in the morning until late in the evening, so your pup can play all day.

Make your pet feel at home: Use familiar dishes, blankets, toys and other items from your home to create a sense of comfort for your pet.

And If Fido can’t travel with you, book him an overnight stay at one of Camp Bow Wows 100+ franchises across the country; you can even watch him while on-the-go via Camp Bow Wow’s iPhone App, which has a web-cam feature that is hooked up at every location.

Erin Askeland, CBCC-KA, Pet Behaviorist, Training Manager and #GiveAFetch Pet Expert at Camp Bow Wow

 

Image Source: Pixabay

Guest Post: Quick & Easy Ways to Pet-Proof Your Home for the Holidays

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Quick & Easy Ways to Pet-Proof Your Home for the Holidays

To truly pet-proof your home, start by getting down on the floor to see the world the way your pet sees it. This allows you to spot potential hazards that you might not notice from your vantage point.

Treat your pet like you would a child: Active puppies and kittens can easily get into dangerous situations. Use safety gates in areas where dangerous holiday items are to prevent your pet from getting into trouble.

Take caution with wires: Pets can easily injure themselves with electrical wires and outlets. Use caution when hanging up holiday lights on trees and around the house. Secure all electrical cords and outlets and keep your dog in areas of your home where cords cannot be accessed.

Avoid holiday plants: Plants can be poisonous for pets, so be cautious when placing holiday wreaths, flowers and plants around the house where your dog can easily access them.

Candles: Lit candles pose a serious threat to both your dog and your home. Keep your dog away from candles because they can easily be knocked down creating a fire hazard.

Hide the trash can: A hyper puppy can easily knock over a trash can and spread garbage and bacteria throughout your home. In addition, dogs can choke on hazardous items so be sure to properly dispose of all holiday wrapping and keep it out of your dog’s reach.

Utilize a sofa cover: To avoid fur on your loveseat, use a seat or slipcover to avoid a mess before guests arrive.

Be careful with fruit and candy baskets: Holiday treats will inevitably be present during this season, but grapes, raisins, chocolate and other holiday treats are actually deadly for dogs. Candy wrappers can also be threatening to your dog, so be sure to throw away all wrappers in a place where your dog can’t get to them.

Erin Askeland, CBCC-KA, Pet Behaviorist, Training Manager and #GiveAFetch Pet Expert at Camp Bow Wow

 

Image Source: Pixabay